Plant RAMS Study

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi:

“Goals transform a random walk into a chase.”

The intention of the plant-level RAMS Study (RAMS = Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Safety) is to estimate the stochastic performance of your production system based on historical data and in terms of defined performance vectors, e.g. production volume and maintenance cost, etc.. This enables the current stochastic performance of the production system to be compared against your performance targets and the “performance gap” (or target vector) to be quantified.

Left: High-level Block Flow Diagram (BFD) of the production system; Right: Estimated stochastic performance of the production system in relation to the performance targets.

The RAMS Study provides a transparent basis to align and motivate the reliability organisation to strive towards achieving the defined performance targets. The RAMS Study is conducted by creating a high-level “digital twin” of your production system using the VirtualWorld software. The developed model also provides a basis for evaluating the merits of proposed measures for improving production system performance.

The required data include, for example:

  • A high-level Block Flow Diagram (BFD) of the production system.
  • Historical data describing the production system performance, e.g. production loss accounting data and maintenance cost data.

The project deliverable is a report that:

  • Documents the model data, including the results of statistical analysis of the production loss accounting data and maintenance cost data.
  • Provides data and charts illustrating the stochastic performance of the production system.
  • Compares the performance of the production system against your performance targets.
  • Provides general recommendations for improving system performance, e.g. focus areas.

Note: The VirtualWorld software and the developed Plant-Level Model (PLM) of the production system are not project deliverables.

The required effort (typically 2 to 10 days) depends heavily upon the data quantity and quality, and also upon the complexity and clarity of your taxonomies for production loss accounting and maintenance cost categories.

The PLM is the basis for the RAMS Mentat approach to process plant reliability engineering and may be further developed into a Unit-Level Model (ULM) or Asset-Level Model (ALM) to further support your reliability improvement journey.

Let the chase begin!